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5 Things You Didn’t Know About Zima, Everyone’s Favorite ‘90s Mistake That's Back

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Zima, Everyone’s Favorite ‘90s Mistake That's Back


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The beer alternative is heading back to convenience store shelves

MillerCoors

The bottle has a new design.

The “premium malt beverage” category is a pretty crowded field these days, with Smirnoff Ice, Mike’s Hard, and a handful of other drinks having staked their claim years ago. But nostalgia is a powerful force, and just like with Crystal Pepsi, a longing for the past has brought Zima out of retirement; it will hit the shelves again starting on July 4 weekend. But before you take a trip down bad memory lane and crack open your first bottle in over a decade, read up on five things you didn’t know about Zima.

It’s owned by MillerCoors
The company (which was just called Coors Brewing Company back then) spent $50 million marketing it during its first year on the market.

It means “winter”
“Zima” translates to “winter” in Slavic languages. The name was created by a company called Lexicon Branding, who had a Russian linguist on staff.

It was a massive success in its first year
Thanks in part to the huge marketing campaign surrounding its release, it sold like hotcakes from day one. In fact, during its first year on the shelves, nearly half of all alcohol drinkers in America tried it at least once.

Lots of different Zima flavors were released
In order to convince more men to try the product, Zima Gold (which claimed to have the “taste of bourbon”) was released in 1995, and it was a huge failure. During the product’s decline in the 2000s several other flavors were introduced as well, including pineapple citrus, tangerine, citrus, blackberry, and green apple.

It never stopped being sold in Japan
Even though it was discontinued in the U.S., it never left store shelves in Japan.


Alzheimer's: 25 Signs Never to Ignore

istockphoto Everyone struggles to come up with a name once in a while. But how can you tell if it's more serious?

"One symptom alone does not necessarily indicate that a person has Alzheimer's or dementia," says Raj C. Shah, MD, of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago. Dementia is chronic loss of cognition, usually affecting memory, and Alzheimer's causes 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

There are many other causes of memory loss, including vitamin B12 deficiency, and brain, thyroid, kidney, or liver disorders. However, having several other symptoms could be a sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Recognizing the signs of dementia can help lead to a quicker diagnosis.

Our friends at Health.com have come up with the list of symptoms never to ignore.
More from Health.com: The Best Memory Boosters


Alzheimer's: 25 Signs Never to Ignore

istockphoto Everyone struggles to come up with a name once in a while. But how can you tell if it's more serious?

"One symptom alone does not necessarily indicate that a person has Alzheimer's or dementia," says Raj C. Shah, MD, of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago. Dementia is chronic loss of cognition, usually affecting memory, and Alzheimer's causes 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

There are many other causes of memory loss, including vitamin B12 deficiency, and brain, thyroid, kidney, or liver disorders. However, having several other symptoms could be a sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Recognizing the signs of dementia can help lead to a quicker diagnosis.

Our friends at Health.com have come up with the list of symptoms never to ignore.
More from Health.com: The Best Memory Boosters


Alzheimer's: 25 Signs Never to Ignore

istockphoto Everyone struggles to come up with a name once in a while. But how can you tell if it's more serious?

"One symptom alone does not necessarily indicate that a person has Alzheimer's or dementia," says Raj C. Shah, MD, of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago. Dementia is chronic loss of cognition, usually affecting memory, and Alzheimer's causes 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

There are many other causes of memory loss, including vitamin B12 deficiency, and brain, thyroid, kidney, or liver disorders. However, having several other symptoms could be a sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Recognizing the signs of dementia can help lead to a quicker diagnosis.

Our friends at Health.com have come up with the list of symptoms never to ignore.
More from Health.com: The Best Memory Boosters


Alzheimer's: 25 Signs Never to Ignore

istockphoto Everyone struggles to come up with a name once in a while. But how can you tell if it's more serious?

"One symptom alone does not necessarily indicate that a person has Alzheimer's or dementia," says Raj C. Shah, MD, of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago. Dementia is chronic loss of cognition, usually affecting memory, and Alzheimer's causes 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

There are many other causes of memory loss, including vitamin B12 deficiency, and brain, thyroid, kidney, or liver disorders. However, having several other symptoms could be a sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Recognizing the signs of dementia can help lead to a quicker diagnosis.

Our friends at Health.com have come up with the list of symptoms never to ignore.
More from Health.com: The Best Memory Boosters


Alzheimer's: 25 Signs Never to Ignore

istockphoto Everyone struggles to come up with a name once in a while. But how can you tell if it's more serious?

"One symptom alone does not necessarily indicate that a person has Alzheimer's or dementia," says Raj C. Shah, MD, of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago. Dementia is chronic loss of cognition, usually affecting memory, and Alzheimer's causes 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

There are many other causes of memory loss, including vitamin B12 deficiency, and brain, thyroid, kidney, or liver disorders. However, having several other symptoms could be a sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Recognizing the signs of dementia can help lead to a quicker diagnosis.

Our friends at Health.com have come up with the list of symptoms never to ignore.
More from Health.com: The Best Memory Boosters


Alzheimer's: 25 Signs Never to Ignore

istockphoto Everyone struggles to come up with a name once in a while. But how can you tell if it's more serious?

"One symptom alone does not necessarily indicate that a person has Alzheimer's or dementia," says Raj C. Shah, MD, of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago. Dementia is chronic loss of cognition, usually affecting memory, and Alzheimer's causes 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

There are many other causes of memory loss, including vitamin B12 deficiency, and brain, thyroid, kidney, or liver disorders. However, having several other symptoms could be a sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Recognizing the signs of dementia can help lead to a quicker diagnosis.

Our friends at Health.com have come up with the list of symptoms never to ignore.
More from Health.com: The Best Memory Boosters


Alzheimer's: 25 Signs Never to Ignore

istockphoto Everyone struggles to come up with a name once in a while. But how can you tell if it's more serious?

"One symptom alone does not necessarily indicate that a person has Alzheimer's or dementia," says Raj C. Shah, MD, of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago. Dementia is chronic loss of cognition, usually affecting memory, and Alzheimer's causes 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

There are many other causes of memory loss, including vitamin B12 deficiency, and brain, thyroid, kidney, or liver disorders. However, having several other symptoms could be a sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Recognizing the signs of dementia can help lead to a quicker diagnosis.

Our friends at Health.com have come up with the list of symptoms never to ignore.
More from Health.com: The Best Memory Boosters


Alzheimer's: 25 Signs Never to Ignore

istockphoto Everyone struggles to come up with a name once in a while. But how can you tell if it's more serious?

"One symptom alone does not necessarily indicate that a person has Alzheimer's or dementia," says Raj C. Shah, MD, of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago. Dementia is chronic loss of cognition, usually affecting memory, and Alzheimer's causes 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

There are many other causes of memory loss, including vitamin B12 deficiency, and brain, thyroid, kidney, or liver disorders. However, having several other symptoms could be a sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Recognizing the signs of dementia can help lead to a quicker diagnosis.

Our friends at Health.com have come up with the list of symptoms never to ignore.
More from Health.com: The Best Memory Boosters


Alzheimer's: 25 Signs Never to Ignore

istockphoto Everyone struggles to come up with a name once in a while. But how can you tell if it's more serious?

"One symptom alone does not necessarily indicate that a person has Alzheimer's or dementia," says Raj C. Shah, MD, of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago. Dementia is chronic loss of cognition, usually affecting memory, and Alzheimer's causes 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

There are many other causes of memory loss, including vitamin B12 deficiency, and brain, thyroid, kidney, or liver disorders. However, having several other symptoms could be a sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Recognizing the signs of dementia can help lead to a quicker diagnosis.

Our friends at Health.com have come up with the list of symptoms never to ignore.
More from Health.com: The Best Memory Boosters


Alzheimer's: 25 Signs Never to Ignore

istockphoto Everyone struggles to come up with a name once in a while. But how can you tell if it's more serious?

"One symptom alone does not necessarily indicate that a person has Alzheimer's or dementia," says Raj C. Shah, MD, of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago. Dementia is chronic loss of cognition, usually affecting memory, and Alzheimer's causes 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

There are many other causes of memory loss, including vitamin B12 deficiency, and brain, thyroid, kidney, or liver disorders. However, having several other symptoms could be a sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Recognizing the signs of dementia can help lead to a quicker diagnosis.

Our friends at Health.com have come up with the list of symptoms never to ignore.
More from Health.com: The Best Memory Boosters



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