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Pigging Out Texas-Style with Tim Love

Pigging Out Texas-Style with Tim Love


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The launch of the inaugural Atlanta Food & Wine Festival on May 19th means many of the country's best Southern chefs will be gathering there for demos, tastings, seminars, and a celebration of Southern food and living.

Chef Tim Love (of Lonesome Dove Bistro in Fort Worth, Texas) who you may have seen elsewhere on the food and drink circuit, was kind enough to share what he'll be doing in his event and why the festival is important. He also gives pointers on cooking animals whole, reports on the frenzy around his Denton Love Shack (did you know there's a secret off-the-menu burger?), and shared details about his upcoming "global taqueria."

What does it mean to be participating in the upcoming Atlanta Food & Wine Festival?

I do a lot of events around the country, but this one hits me in my backyard. You know what I mean? It’s going to be my kind of event. You’re going to be able to graze around, there will be smoke in the air, good music, kind of like the way it is in the summertime. It’s going to be very comfortable. I’m very happy about it as an event.

And you know this is the first time that there’s a big food and wine festival like this that honors the South. It’s important especially considering all the things that have been happening in the South and with the storms. It’s nice to be celebrating some good stuff. And people in the South know how to have fun. That’s what I enjoy. Experiencing great food and not really worrying about all these other things for a moment. We’re masters of killing time, drinking, and making good food.

Your Pig Out Texas-Style event at the festival, what's it about?

It’s going to be pretty awesome is what it is. Chef Ford and I are going to do pretty much everything you can do with a pig, and then more. We’re going to have a lot of bourbon, and cocktails, and pig out I suppose.

But what specifically are you going to do with the pig?

I’m doing wild boar crepinettes. I’m going to take a whole wild boar, roast it over a fire, wrap it in caul fat then reroast it. It’s going to be juicy inside, with a slight crispy crust on the outside, and I’ll serve it with some vinegary braised lentils that will have chunks of pork in it, chilis, and lots of garlic. And I’ll do bourbon and Coke roasted pork. You take a whole roasted pork butt and roast it in a giant cocktail. I’ll serve it with fresh corn tortillas and pickled chilies, kind of like a southern bahn mi. I’m planning smoked pork and rabbit green chili with smoked Cheddar and minced Vidalia onions. And then a salad as well, fresh endive, apples, celery greens, and guanciale.


These Are the 6 Components of the Ideal Texas Barbecue, According to Chef Tim Love

Growing up in Texas, Chef Tim Love developed a deep love for barbecue. Not just as a method of cooking, but also the social aspects of gathering around an open flame as dinner is prepared.

“I remember the excitement around the food, and this tremendous sense of community and camaraderie that you felt,” says Love. Now the chef celebrates the art of the barbecue at his collection of restaurants all over Texas, at music festivals like Austin City Limits, and of course in his own hometown of Fort Worth.

Given his credentials, Love seemed like the perfect person for InsideHook to ask about the idyllic Texas barbecue, and all the dishes that should be present.

“For some people, simplicity is the hardest thing to overcome,” says Love. “I love cooking on big open fires, and you’d be surprised how much you can change with just the positioning, and using the winds with the smoke. As far as the food, it’s when you try to complicate things that you get into trouble.”

As for what Love’s idea of simplicity translates to in more explicit terms? Try the six dishes — well, five dishes and one tipple — below.

“I need to have a beef rib on any classic plate of barbecue. I love them. Recently we just started doing 28-day dry aged ribs, which nobody is doing. The danger with dry-aged meat is over cooking it, because there is so little moisture left in the meat. But it absorbs that smoke flavor so well on the grill, and it gets this beautiful crispiness from the fat. It is rich, and intense. I am very light on the sauce, because I want to taste the meat.

Getting the best meat is crucial, so that means tracking down the best farm or ranch in your area, or the best butcher. I have been working on my own brand of beef now for awhile. I raised cattle as a kid, and put about ten years in it. I have always been interested in what makes one beef better than the other. There is no doubt finding the right spot makes all the difference.”

“I am a big mustard potato salad guy, especially when it comes to being on a plate with some barbecue. I like the tartness. I believe if you are going to have any kind of smoked meat, you need to have something that contrasts with it and brings a flavor that is going to cut through. And that means mustard in the potato salad.”

“I like my beans with a lot of beer in them. I use pinto beans and it is all about cooking them very slow. It doesn’t get much more classic than barbecue and beans. I will also put some guanciale pork in there, which is my pork of choice, that pig cheek bacon. I started making these beans with Sierra Nevada Pale Ale a long time ago, back when I was living in Colorado and I have stuck with it.”

“I personally would pickle virtually any kind of vegetable and eat it with barbecue. I mean we are talking okra, onion, asparagus, beets, radishes or anything else. In a perfect world you have some spicy and some sweet. You need to get that acidity. I have raised beds where I grow vegetables at my home. We are getting amazing asparagus, fennel, spring onions and tomatoes, and artichokes right now. The artichokes are just coming in because of that late freeze that we got here in Texas.”

“I always want to have white bread on there. That is maybe just because of the tradition for me. If you are having some good fatty barbecue, it is hard to beat a simple piece of white bread to soak that shit up with.”

“Sitting down at the dinner table with my family and friends, I want a nice glass of tequila on the rocks, topped off with some Topo Chico. There is a great tequila company out of Austin called Lalo that I have been enjoying. I think it’s one of the best blancos out there.”


These Are the 6 Components of the Ideal Texas Barbecue, According to Chef Tim Love

Growing up in Texas, Chef Tim Love developed a deep love for barbecue. Not just as a method of cooking, but also the social aspects of gathering around an open flame as dinner is prepared.

“I remember the excitement around the food, and this tremendous sense of community and camaraderie that you felt,” says Love. Now the chef celebrates the art of the barbecue at his collection of restaurants all over Texas, at music festivals like Austin City Limits, and of course in his own hometown of Fort Worth.

Given his credentials, Love seemed like the perfect person for InsideHook to ask about the idyllic Texas barbecue, and all the dishes that should be present.

“For some people, simplicity is the hardest thing to overcome,” says Love. “I love cooking on big open fires, and you’d be surprised how much you can change with just the positioning, and using the winds with the smoke. As far as the food, it’s when you try to complicate things that you get into trouble.”

As for what Love’s idea of simplicity translates to in more explicit terms? Try the six dishes — well, five dishes and one tipple — below.

“I need to have a beef rib on any classic plate of barbecue. I love them. Recently we just started doing 28-day dry aged ribs, which nobody is doing. The danger with dry-aged meat is over cooking it, because there is so little moisture left in the meat. But it absorbs that smoke flavor so well on the grill, and it gets this beautiful crispiness from the fat. It is rich, and intense. I am very light on the sauce, because I want to taste the meat.

Getting the best meat is crucial, so that means tracking down the best farm or ranch in your area, or the best butcher. I have been working on my own brand of beef now for awhile. I raised cattle as a kid, and put about ten years in it. I have always been interested in what makes one beef better than the other. There is no doubt finding the right spot makes all the difference.”

“I am a big mustard potato salad guy, especially when it comes to being on a plate with some barbecue. I like the tartness. I believe if you are going to have any kind of smoked meat, you need to have something that contrasts with it and brings a flavor that is going to cut through. And that means mustard in the potato salad.”

“I like my beans with a lot of beer in them. I use pinto beans and it is all about cooking them very slow. It doesn’t get much more classic than barbecue and beans. I will also put some guanciale pork in there, which is my pork of choice, that pig cheek bacon. I started making these beans with Sierra Nevada Pale Ale a long time ago, back when I was living in Colorado and I have stuck with it.”

“I personally would pickle virtually any kind of vegetable and eat it with barbecue. I mean we are talking okra, onion, asparagus, beets, radishes or anything else. In a perfect world you have some spicy and some sweet. You need to get that acidity. I have raised beds where I grow vegetables at my home. We are getting amazing asparagus, fennel, spring onions and tomatoes, and artichokes right now. The artichokes are just coming in because of that late freeze that we got here in Texas.”

“I always want to have white bread on there. That is maybe just because of the tradition for me. If you are having some good fatty barbecue, it is hard to beat a simple piece of white bread to soak that shit up with.”

“Sitting down at the dinner table with my family and friends, I want a nice glass of tequila on the rocks, topped off with some Topo Chico. There is a great tequila company out of Austin called Lalo that I have been enjoying. I think it’s one of the best blancos out there.”


These Are the 6 Components of the Ideal Texas Barbecue, According to Chef Tim Love

Growing up in Texas, Chef Tim Love developed a deep love for barbecue. Not just as a method of cooking, but also the social aspects of gathering around an open flame as dinner is prepared.

“I remember the excitement around the food, and this tremendous sense of community and camaraderie that you felt,” says Love. Now the chef celebrates the art of the barbecue at his collection of restaurants all over Texas, at music festivals like Austin City Limits, and of course in his own hometown of Fort Worth.

Given his credentials, Love seemed like the perfect person for InsideHook to ask about the idyllic Texas barbecue, and all the dishes that should be present.

“For some people, simplicity is the hardest thing to overcome,” says Love. “I love cooking on big open fires, and you’d be surprised how much you can change with just the positioning, and using the winds with the smoke. As far as the food, it’s when you try to complicate things that you get into trouble.”

As for what Love’s idea of simplicity translates to in more explicit terms? Try the six dishes — well, five dishes and one tipple — below.

“I need to have a beef rib on any classic plate of barbecue. I love them. Recently we just started doing 28-day dry aged ribs, which nobody is doing. The danger with dry-aged meat is over cooking it, because there is so little moisture left in the meat. But it absorbs that smoke flavor so well on the grill, and it gets this beautiful crispiness from the fat. It is rich, and intense. I am very light on the sauce, because I want to taste the meat.

Getting the best meat is crucial, so that means tracking down the best farm or ranch in your area, or the best butcher. I have been working on my own brand of beef now for awhile. I raised cattle as a kid, and put about ten years in it. I have always been interested in what makes one beef better than the other. There is no doubt finding the right spot makes all the difference.”

“I am a big mustard potato salad guy, especially when it comes to being on a plate with some barbecue. I like the tartness. I believe if you are going to have any kind of smoked meat, you need to have something that contrasts with it and brings a flavor that is going to cut through. And that means mustard in the potato salad.”

“I like my beans with a lot of beer in them. I use pinto beans and it is all about cooking them very slow. It doesn’t get much more classic than barbecue and beans. I will also put some guanciale pork in there, which is my pork of choice, that pig cheek bacon. I started making these beans with Sierra Nevada Pale Ale a long time ago, back when I was living in Colorado and I have stuck with it.”

“I personally would pickle virtually any kind of vegetable and eat it with barbecue. I mean we are talking okra, onion, asparagus, beets, radishes or anything else. In a perfect world you have some spicy and some sweet. You need to get that acidity. I have raised beds where I grow vegetables at my home. We are getting amazing asparagus, fennel, spring onions and tomatoes, and artichokes right now. The artichokes are just coming in because of that late freeze that we got here in Texas.”

“I always want to have white bread on there. That is maybe just because of the tradition for me. If you are having some good fatty barbecue, it is hard to beat a simple piece of white bread to soak that shit up with.”

“Sitting down at the dinner table with my family and friends, I want a nice glass of tequila on the rocks, topped off with some Topo Chico. There is a great tequila company out of Austin called Lalo that I have been enjoying. I think it’s one of the best blancos out there.”


These Are the 6 Components of the Ideal Texas Barbecue, According to Chef Tim Love

Growing up in Texas, Chef Tim Love developed a deep love for barbecue. Not just as a method of cooking, but also the social aspects of gathering around an open flame as dinner is prepared.

“I remember the excitement around the food, and this tremendous sense of community and camaraderie that you felt,” says Love. Now the chef celebrates the art of the barbecue at his collection of restaurants all over Texas, at music festivals like Austin City Limits, and of course in his own hometown of Fort Worth.

Given his credentials, Love seemed like the perfect person for InsideHook to ask about the idyllic Texas barbecue, and all the dishes that should be present.

“For some people, simplicity is the hardest thing to overcome,” says Love. “I love cooking on big open fires, and you’d be surprised how much you can change with just the positioning, and using the winds with the smoke. As far as the food, it’s when you try to complicate things that you get into trouble.”

As for what Love’s idea of simplicity translates to in more explicit terms? Try the six dishes — well, five dishes and one tipple — below.

“I need to have a beef rib on any classic plate of barbecue. I love them. Recently we just started doing 28-day dry aged ribs, which nobody is doing. The danger with dry-aged meat is over cooking it, because there is so little moisture left in the meat. But it absorbs that smoke flavor so well on the grill, and it gets this beautiful crispiness from the fat. It is rich, and intense. I am very light on the sauce, because I want to taste the meat.

Getting the best meat is crucial, so that means tracking down the best farm or ranch in your area, or the best butcher. I have been working on my own brand of beef now for awhile. I raised cattle as a kid, and put about ten years in it. I have always been interested in what makes one beef better than the other. There is no doubt finding the right spot makes all the difference.”

“I am a big mustard potato salad guy, especially when it comes to being on a plate with some barbecue. I like the tartness. I believe if you are going to have any kind of smoked meat, you need to have something that contrasts with it and brings a flavor that is going to cut through. And that means mustard in the potato salad.”

“I like my beans with a lot of beer in them. I use pinto beans and it is all about cooking them very slow. It doesn’t get much more classic than barbecue and beans. I will also put some guanciale pork in there, which is my pork of choice, that pig cheek bacon. I started making these beans with Sierra Nevada Pale Ale a long time ago, back when I was living in Colorado and I have stuck with it.”

“I personally would pickle virtually any kind of vegetable and eat it with barbecue. I mean we are talking okra, onion, asparagus, beets, radishes or anything else. In a perfect world you have some spicy and some sweet. You need to get that acidity. I have raised beds where I grow vegetables at my home. We are getting amazing asparagus, fennel, spring onions and tomatoes, and artichokes right now. The artichokes are just coming in because of that late freeze that we got here in Texas.”

“I always want to have white bread on there. That is maybe just because of the tradition for me. If you are having some good fatty barbecue, it is hard to beat a simple piece of white bread to soak that shit up with.”

“Sitting down at the dinner table with my family and friends, I want a nice glass of tequila on the rocks, topped off with some Topo Chico. There is a great tequila company out of Austin called Lalo that I have been enjoying. I think it’s one of the best blancos out there.”


These Are the 6 Components of the Ideal Texas Barbecue, According to Chef Tim Love

Growing up in Texas, Chef Tim Love developed a deep love for barbecue. Not just as a method of cooking, but also the social aspects of gathering around an open flame as dinner is prepared.

“I remember the excitement around the food, and this tremendous sense of community and camaraderie that you felt,” says Love. Now the chef celebrates the art of the barbecue at his collection of restaurants all over Texas, at music festivals like Austin City Limits, and of course in his own hometown of Fort Worth.

Given his credentials, Love seemed like the perfect person for InsideHook to ask about the idyllic Texas barbecue, and all the dishes that should be present.

“For some people, simplicity is the hardest thing to overcome,” says Love. “I love cooking on big open fires, and you’d be surprised how much you can change with just the positioning, and using the winds with the smoke. As far as the food, it’s when you try to complicate things that you get into trouble.”

As for what Love’s idea of simplicity translates to in more explicit terms? Try the six dishes — well, five dishes and one tipple — below.

“I need to have a beef rib on any classic plate of barbecue. I love them. Recently we just started doing 28-day dry aged ribs, which nobody is doing. The danger with dry-aged meat is over cooking it, because there is so little moisture left in the meat. But it absorbs that smoke flavor so well on the grill, and it gets this beautiful crispiness from the fat. It is rich, and intense. I am very light on the sauce, because I want to taste the meat.

Getting the best meat is crucial, so that means tracking down the best farm or ranch in your area, or the best butcher. I have been working on my own brand of beef now for awhile. I raised cattle as a kid, and put about ten years in it. I have always been interested in what makes one beef better than the other. There is no doubt finding the right spot makes all the difference.”

“I am a big mustard potato salad guy, especially when it comes to being on a plate with some barbecue. I like the tartness. I believe if you are going to have any kind of smoked meat, you need to have something that contrasts with it and brings a flavor that is going to cut through. And that means mustard in the potato salad.”

“I like my beans with a lot of beer in them. I use pinto beans and it is all about cooking them very slow. It doesn’t get much more classic than barbecue and beans. I will also put some guanciale pork in there, which is my pork of choice, that pig cheek bacon. I started making these beans with Sierra Nevada Pale Ale a long time ago, back when I was living in Colorado and I have stuck with it.”

“I personally would pickle virtually any kind of vegetable and eat it with barbecue. I mean we are talking okra, onion, asparagus, beets, radishes or anything else. In a perfect world you have some spicy and some sweet. You need to get that acidity. I have raised beds where I grow vegetables at my home. We are getting amazing asparagus, fennel, spring onions and tomatoes, and artichokes right now. The artichokes are just coming in because of that late freeze that we got here in Texas.”

“I always want to have white bread on there. That is maybe just because of the tradition for me. If you are having some good fatty barbecue, it is hard to beat a simple piece of white bread to soak that shit up with.”

“Sitting down at the dinner table with my family and friends, I want a nice glass of tequila on the rocks, topped off with some Topo Chico. There is a great tequila company out of Austin called Lalo that I have been enjoying. I think it’s one of the best blancos out there.”


These Are the 6 Components of the Ideal Texas Barbecue, According to Chef Tim Love

Growing up in Texas, Chef Tim Love developed a deep love for barbecue. Not just as a method of cooking, but also the social aspects of gathering around an open flame as dinner is prepared.

“I remember the excitement around the food, and this tremendous sense of community and camaraderie that you felt,” says Love. Now the chef celebrates the art of the barbecue at his collection of restaurants all over Texas, at music festivals like Austin City Limits, and of course in his own hometown of Fort Worth.

Given his credentials, Love seemed like the perfect person for InsideHook to ask about the idyllic Texas barbecue, and all the dishes that should be present.

“For some people, simplicity is the hardest thing to overcome,” says Love. “I love cooking on big open fires, and you’d be surprised how much you can change with just the positioning, and using the winds with the smoke. As far as the food, it’s when you try to complicate things that you get into trouble.”

As for what Love’s idea of simplicity translates to in more explicit terms? Try the six dishes — well, five dishes and one tipple — below.

“I need to have a beef rib on any classic plate of barbecue. I love them. Recently we just started doing 28-day dry aged ribs, which nobody is doing. The danger with dry-aged meat is over cooking it, because there is so little moisture left in the meat. But it absorbs that smoke flavor so well on the grill, and it gets this beautiful crispiness from the fat. It is rich, and intense. I am very light on the sauce, because I want to taste the meat.

Getting the best meat is crucial, so that means tracking down the best farm or ranch in your area, or the best butcher. I have been working on my own brand of beef now for awhile. I raised cattle as a kid, and put about ten years in it. I have always been interested in what makes one beef better than the other. There is no doubt finding the right spot makes all the difference.”

“I am a big mustard potato salad guy, especially when it comes to being on a plate with some barbecue. I like the tartness. I believe if you are going to have any kind of smoked meat, you need to have something that contrasts with it and brings a flavor that is going to cut through. And that means mustard in the potato salad.”

“I like my beans with a lot of beer in them. I use pinto beans and it is all about cooking them very slow. It doesn’t get much more classic than barbecue and beans. I will also put some guanciale pork in there, which is my pork of choice, that pig cheek bacon. I started making these beans with Sierra Nevada Pale Ale a long time ago, back when I was living in Colorado and I have stuck with it.”

“I personally would pickle virtually any kind of vegetable and eat it with barbecue. I mean we are talking okra, onion, asparagus, beets, radishes or anything else. In a perfect world you have some spicy and some sweet. You need to get that acidity. I have raised beds where I grow vegetables at my home. We are getting amazing asparagus, fennel, spring onions and tomatoes, and artichokes right now. The artichokes are just coming in because of that late freeze that we got here in Texas.”

“I always want to have white bread on there. That is maybe just because of the tradition for me. If you are having some good fatty barbecue, it is hard to beat a simple piece of white bread to soak that shit up with.”

“Sitting down at the dinner table with my family and friends, I want a nice glass of tequila on the rocks, topped off with some Topo Chico. There is a great tequila company out of Austin called Lalo that I have been enjoying. I think it’s one of the best blancos out there.”


These Are the 6 Components of the Ideal Texas Barbecue, According to Chef Tim Love

Growing up in Texas, Chef Tim Love developed a deep love for barbecue. Not just as a method of cooking, but also the social aspects of gathering around an open flame as dinner is prepared.

“I remember the excitement around the food, and this tremendous sense of community and camaraderie that you felt,” says Love. Now the chef celebrates the art of the barbecue at his collection of restaurants all over Texas, at music festivals like Austin City Limits, and of course in his own hometown of Fort Worth.

Given his credentials, Love seemed like the perfect person for InsideHook to ask about the idyllic Texas barbecue, and all the dishes that should be present.

“For some people, simplicity is the hardest thing to overcome,” says Love. “I love cooking on big open fires, and you’d be surprised how much you can change with just the positioning, and using the winds with the smoke. As far as the food, it’s when you try to complicate things that you get into trouble.”

As for what Love’s idea of simplicity translates to in more explicit terms? Try the six dishes — well, five dishes and one tipple — below.

“I need to have a beef rib on any classic plate of barbecue. I love them. Recently we just started doing 28-day dry aged ribs, which nobody is doing. The danger with dry-aged meat is over cooking it, because there is so little moisture left in the meat. But it absorbs that smoke flavor so well on the grill, and it gets this beautiful crispiness from the fat. It is rich, and intense. I am very light on the sauce, because I want to taste the meat.

Getting the best meat is crucial, so that means tracking down the best farm or ranch in your area, or the best butcher. I have been working on my own brand of beef now for awhile. I raised cattle as a kid, and put about ten years in it. I have always been interested in what makes one beef better than the other. There is no doubt finding the right spot makes all the difference.”

“I am a big mustard potato salad guy, especially when it comes to being on a plate with some barbecue. I like the tartness. I believe if you are going to have any kind of smoked meat, you need to have something that contrasts with it and brings a flavor that is going to cut through. And that means mustard in the potato salad.”

“I like my beans with a lot of beer in them. I use pinto beans and it is all about cooking them very slow. It doesn’t get much more classic than barbecue and beans. I will also put some guanciale pork in there, which is my pork of choice, that pig cheek bacon. I started making these beans with Sierra Nevada Pale Ale a long time ago, back when I was living in Colorado and I have stuck with it.”

“I personally would pickle virtually any kind of vegetable and eat it with barbecue. I mean we are talking okra, onion, asparagus, beets, radishes or anything else. In a perfect world you have some spicy and some sweet. You need to get that acidity. I have raised beds where I grow vegetables at my home. We are getting amazing asparagus, fennel, spring onions and tomatoes, and artichokes right now. The artichokes are just coming in because of that late freeze that we got here in Texas.”

“I always want to have white bread on there. That is maybe just because of the tradition for me. If you are having some good fatty barbecue, it is hard to beat a simple piece of white bread to soak that shit up with.”

“Sitting down at the dinner table with my family and friends, I want a nice glass of tequila on the rocks, topped off with some Topo Chico. There is a great tequila company out of Austin called Lalo that I have been enjoying. I think it’s one of the best blancos out there.”


These Are the 6 Components of the Ideal Texas Barbecue, According to Chef Tim Love

Growing up in Texas, Chef Tim Love developed a deep love for barbecue. Not just as a method of cooking, but also the social aspects of gathering around an open flame as dinner is prepared.

“I remember the excitement around the food, and this tremendous sense of community and camaraderie that you felt,” says Love. Now the chef celebrates the art of the barbecue at his collection of restaurants all over Texas, at music festivals like Austin City Limits, and of course in his own hometown of Fort Worth.

Given his credentials, Love seemed like the perfect person for InsideHook to ask about the idyllic Texas barbecue, and all the dishes that should be present.

“For some people, simplicity is the hardest thing to overcome,” says Love. “I love cooking on big open fires, and you’d be surprised how much you can change with just the positioning, and using the winds with the smoke. As far as the food, it’s when you try to complicate things that you get into trouble.”

As for what Love’s idea of simplicity translates to in more explicit terms? Try the six dishes — well, five dishes and one tipple — below.

“I need to have a beef rib on any classic plate of barbecue. I love them. Recently we just started doing 28-day dry aged ribs, which nobody is doing. The danger with dry-aged meat is over cooking it, because there is so little moisture left in the meat. But it absorbs that smoke flavor so well on the grill, and it gets this beautiful crispiness from the fat. It is rich, and intense. I am very light on the sauce, because I want to taste the meat.

Getting the best meat is crucial, so that means tracking down the best farm or ranch in your area, or the best butcher. I have been working on my own brand of beef now for awhile. I raised cattle as a kid, and put about ten years in it. I have always been interested in what makes one beef better than the other. There is no doubt finding the right spot makes all the difference.”

“I am a big mustard potato salad guy, especially when it comes to being on a plate with some barbecue. I like the tartness. I believe if you are going to have any kind of smoked meat, you need to have something that contrasts with it and brings a flavor that is going to cut through. And that means mustard in the potato salad.”

“I like my beans with a lot of beer in them. I use pinto beans and it is all about cooking them very slow. It doesn’t get much more classic than barbecue and beans. I will also put some guanciale pork in there, which is my pork of choice, that pig cheek bacon. I started making these beans with Sierra Nevada Pale Ale a long time ago, back when I was living in Colorado and I have stuck with it.”

“I personally would pickle virtually any kind of vegetable and eat it with barbecue. I mean we are talking okra, onion, asparagus, beets, radishes or anything else. In a perfect world you have some spicy and some sweet. You need to get that acidity. I have raised beds where I grow vegetables at my home. We are getting amazing asparagus, fennel, spring onions and tomatoes, and artichokes right now. The artichokes are just coming in because of that late freeze that we got here in Texas.”

“I always want to have white bread on there. That is maybe just because of the tradition for me. If you are having some good fatty barbecue, it is hard to beat a simple piece of white bread to soak that shit up with.”

“Sitting down at the dinner table with my family and friends, I want a nice glass of tequila on the rocks, topped off with some Topo Chico. There is a great tequila company out of Austin called Lalo that I have been enjoying. I think it’s one of the best blancos out there.”


These Are the 6 Components of the Ideal Texas Barbecue, According to Chef Tim Love

Growing up in Texas, Chef Tim Love developed a deep love for barbecue. Not just as a method of cooking, but also the social aspects of gathering around an open flame as dinner is prepared.

“I remember the excitement around the food, and this tremendous sense of community and camaraderie that you felt,” says Love. Now the chef celebrates the art of the barbecue at his collection of restaurants all over Texas, at music festivals like Austin City Limits, and of course in his own hometown of Fort Worth.

Given his credentials, Love seemed like the perfect person for InsideHook to ask about the idyllic Texas barbecue, and all the dishes that should be present.

“For some people, simplicity is the hardest thing to overcome,” says Love. “I love cooking on big open fires, and you’d be surprised how much you can change with just the positioning, and using the winds with the smoke. As far as the food, it’s when you try to complicate things that you get into trouble.”

As for what Love’s idea of simplicity translates to in more explicit terms? Try the six dishes — well, five dishes and one tipple — below.

“I need to have a beef rib on any classic plate of barbecue. I love them. Recently we just started doing 28-day dry aged ribs, which nobody is doing. The danger with dry-aged meat is over cooking it, because there is so little moisture left in the meat. But it absorbs that smoke flavor so well on the grill, and it gets this beautiful crispiness from the fat. It is rich, and intense. I am very light on the sauce, because I want to taste the meat.

Getting the best meat is crucial, so that means tracking down the best farm or ranch in your area, or the best butcher. I have been working on my own brand of beef now for awhile. I raised cattle as a kid, and put about ten years in it. I have always been interested in what makes one beef better than the other. There is no doubt finding the right spot makes all the difference.”

“I am a big mustard potato salad guy, especially when it comes to being on a plate with some barbecue. I like the tartness. I believe if you are going to have any kind of smoked meat, you need to have something that contrasts with it and brings a flavor that is going to cut through. And that means mustard in the potato salad.”

“I like my beans with a lot of beer in them. I use pinto beans and it is all about cooking them very slow. It doesn’t get much more classic than barbecue and beans. I will also put some guanciale pork in there, which is my pork of choice, that pig cheek bacon. I started making these beans with Sierra Nevada Pale Ale a long time ago, back when I was living in Colorado and I have stuck with it.”

“I personally would pickle virtually any kind of vegetable and eat it with barbecue. I mean we are talking okra, onion, asparagus, beets, radishes or anything else. In a perfect world you have some spicy and some sweet. You need to get that acidity. I have raised beds where I grow vegetables at my home. We are getting amazing asparagus, fennel, spring onions and tomatoes, and artichokes right now. The artichokes are just coming in because of that late freeze that we got here in Texas.”

“I always want to have white bread on there. That is maybe just because of the tradition for me. If you are having some good fatty barbecue, it is hard to beat a simple piece of white bread to soak that shit up with.”

“Sitting down at the dinner table with my family and friends, I want a nice glass of tequila on the rocks, topped off with some Topo Chico. There is a great tequila company out of Austin called Lalo that I have been enjoying. I think it’s one of the best blancos out there.”


These Are the 6 Components of the Ideal Texas Barbecue, According to Chef Tim Love

Growing up in Texas, Chef Tim Love developed a deep love for barbecue. Not just as a method of cooking, but also the social aspects of gathering around an open flame as dinner is prepared.

“I remember the excitement around the food, and this tremendous sense of community and camaraderie that you felt,” says Love. Now the chef celebrates the art of the barbecue at his collection of restaurants all over Texas, at music festivals like Austin City Limits, and of course in his own hometown of Fort Worth.

Given his credentials, Love seemed like the perfect person for InsideHook to ask about the idyllic Texas barbecue, and all the dishes that should be present.

“For some people, simplicity is the hardest thing to overcome,” says Love. “I love cooking on big open fires, and you’d be surprised how much you can change with just the positioning, and using the winds with the smoke. As far as the food, it’s when you try to complicate things that you get into trouble.”

As for what Love’s idea of simplicity translates to in more explicit terms? Try the six dishes — well, five dishes and one tipple — below.

“I need to have a beef rib on any classic plate of barbecue. I love them. Recently we just started doing 28-day dry aged ribs, which nobody is doing. The danger with dry-aged meat is over cooking it, because there is so little moisture left in the meat. But it absorbs that smoke flavor so well on the grill, and it gets this beautiful crispiness from the fat. It is rich, and intense. I am very light on the sauce, because I want to taste the meat.

Getting the best meat is crucial, so that means tracking down the best farm or ranch in your area, or the best butcher. I have been working on my own brand of beef now for awhile. I raised cattle as a kid, and put about ten years in it. I have always been interested in what makes one beef better than the other. There is no doubt finding the right spot makes all the difference.”

“I am a big mustard potato salad guy, especially when it comes to being on a plate with some barbecue. I like the tartness. I believe if you are going to have any kind of smoked meat, you need to have something that contrasts with it and brings a flavor that is going to cut through. And that means mustard in the potato salad.”

“I like my beans with a lot of beer in them. I use pinto beans and it is all about cooking them very slow. It doesn’t get much more classic than barbecue and beans. I will also put some guanciale pork in there, which is my pork of choice, that pig cheek bacon. I started making these beans with Sierra Nevada Pale Ale a long time ago, back when I was living in Colorado and I have stuck with it.”

“I personally would pickle virtually any kind of vegetable and eat it with barbecue. I mean we are talking okra, onion, asparagus, beets, radishes or anything else. In a perfect world you have some spicy and some sweet. You need to get that acidity. I have raised beds where I grow vegetables at my home. We are getting amazing asparagus, fennel, spring onions and tomatoes, and artichokes right now. The artichokes are just coming in because of that late freeze that we got here in Texas.”

“I always want to have white bread on there. That is maybe just because of the tradition for me. If you are having some good fatty barbecue, it is hard to beat a simple piece of white bread to soak that shit up with.”

“Sitting down at the dinner table with my family and friends, I want a nice glass of tequila on the rocks, topped off with some Topo Chico. There is a great tequila company out of Austin called Lalo that I have been enjoying. I think it’s one of the best blancos out there.”


Watch the video: Pipeline pig launcher (July 2022).


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