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Washington, D.C. New Menu Report: Week of 12/29/14

Washington, D.C. New Menu Report: Week of 12/29/14


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Adams Morgan

NEW RESTAURANT OPENING. Foodies in search of freshly prepared, authentic Middle Eastern fare in the Adams Morgan and Columbia Heights areas don’t have to trek far for delicious food now that One to One Lebanese Bistro has moved into the former Shawarma Spot space. In addition to usual suspects like lamb and beef shawarma, kofte, lamb and chicken kabobs, hummus, baba ghanoush, and tabbouleh, you can also order two kinds of fowl made with broad beans served with lemon juice and olive oil with the addition of tomatoes or tahini sauce, or traditional Mediterranean lamb sujuk sausage made with paprika, cumin, and fenugreek. It’s a menu full of dishes worth getting delivered.

Atlas District/H Street

This announcement falls into the category of “Things that make you go, ‘Aw!’” Chef Erik Bruner-Yang, culinary master and proud new poppa, is offering a special menu for Daddy-Daughter Day at Toki Underground this Sunday, January 4 (sorry, no moms allowed). This is a great chance for some father-daughter time so dads can take their special girl out on the town. The special menu includes a kid’s cocktail, Taiwanese chicken nuggets, pork, chicken, and seasonal vegetable and seafood dumplings pan-fried, fried, or steamed, plus soup for two, and cookies and milk. Reserve now, because seating and dining times are limited.

Capitol Hill

This New Year’s Eve, Sonoma Restaurant and Wine Bar is hosting a delightful dinner and menu prepared by chef Josh Hutter, and he sets the tone for the evening from the start with a delectable amuse bouche of cauliflower vichyssoise garnished with caviar paired with a glass of non-vintage Champagne, the Lallier Grand Cru Brut Reserve from Aÿ. Other outstanding course selections include gourmet delicacies like white ruffle risotto with wild mushrooms; pan seared monkfish with rock shrimp, baby fennel, Cippolini onions, shiitake mushrooms, and Cioppino broth; and filet mignon with pommes purée, wild mushrooms, bourbon shallot butter, and watercress salad.

Hockey lovers heading out to the NHL Winter Classic will be happy to know Tortilla Coast Capitol Hill, located just walking distance from Nationals Park, has what they need to take off the chill after an outdoor hockey game. This Tex-Mex watering hole has been a Mecca for lobbyists, members of Congress, tourists, and locals since 1988, and this week they are offering a new margarita menu to complement their regular brunch menu and build-your-own Bloody Mary or Maria bar. The classic margarita lets the flavors of 1800 silver tequila, triple sec, fresh lime juice, simple syrup, and soda shine through without interference from artificial mixes or flavors, while the Fire and Ice margarita spices things up with a housemade, infused jalapeño tequila, triple sec, and requisite sour ingredients.

U Street Corridor

New Year’s Eve doesn’t have to include tuxedos, fancy dresses, and a big commotion. For a “no-fuss, no-cover, laid back” party, chef Nathan Beauchamp has put together a terrific tasting menu at The Fainting Goat that doesn’t require a tie and jacket or a cover charge. Their special New Year’s Eve tasting menu includes standouts like steak tartare with garlic confit with rye crisp and quail egg, côte de boeuf with bone marrow bread pudding and béarnaise sauce, and chocolate torte with cherries, walnuts, and sour cream ice cream. And of course, there will be a Champagne toast at midnight.

If you still haven’t made plans for New Year’s Eve, be sure to read our New Year’s Eve Roundup.

Summer Whitford is the D.C. City Guide Editor at The Daily Meal and the DC Wine Examiner. You can follow her on Twitter @FoodandWineDiva.


D.C. church says a bike lane would infringe upon its constitutional ‘rights of religious freedom’

The District government is going through the rather municipally boring process of determining where to build a bike lane on the east side of downtown.

And one church has given a charged response to some proposals, saying that a bike lane near its property would infringe upon “its constitutionally protected rights of religious freedom and equal protection of the laws.”

The District Department of Transportation is exploring installing a protected bike lane going northbound and southbound somewhere between Fifth and Ninth streets NW that would connect to popular east and west protected bike lanes, such as M and L streets NW, or Pennsylvania Avenue NW.

The United House of Prayer is located in the 600 block of M Street NW and three of the four possible bike lane routes would run along at least parts of Sixth Street NW between Florida and Constitution avenues NW. (There is currently a bike lane going northbound on Fifth Street NW starting where the street becomes one way in that direction at the intersection of Fifth Street, New York Avenue and L Street NW.)

The church, represented by a lawyer, wrote in a letter to DDOT, which WashCycle blog obtained and reported on, that the proposals along Sixth Street are “unsupportable, unrealistic and particularly problematic for traffic and parking.” The church, which says it has more than 800 congregants, notes that the Convention Center is in the area, which already exacerbates traffic and parking issues. Consequently, as many car lanes and parking spaces as possible are needed on the street.

The parking loss would place an unconstitutionally undue burden on people who want to pray, the church argues, noting that other churches already have fled to the suburbs because of onerous parking restrictions. The church says that DDOT lets cars park diagonally on the street during busy times, which would be seemingly impossible if a protected bike lane were on the street.

“As you know, bicycles have freely and safely traversed the District of Columbia throughout the 90-year history of the United House of Prayer, without any protected bicycle lanes and without infringing in the least on the United House of Prayer’s religious rights,” the letter states. “More importantly, as discussed at various points with DDOT, there is another alternative that would simply entail altering the proposed bike lane’s route by one block, such that the bike tracks would follow 6th Street to N Street for the block or two needed to avoid impacting adversely on any parking adjacent to God’s White House on 6th and M Streets.”

This isn’t the first time a local church’s opposition to a proposed bike lane has turned into a political fight. When the westbound M Street NW protected cycle track was being planned, the Metropolitan AME church complained that it would result in a loss of parking for the church.


Ex-Capitol Police Chief Says Requests For National Guard Denied 6 Times In Riots

Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund resigned after thousands of supporters of President Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol building on Wednesday. Sund says his requests to superiors to get the National Guard to respond to the riot at the Capitol were rebuffed. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund resigned after thousands of supporters of President Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol building on Wednesday. Sund says his requests to superiors to get the National Guard to respond to the riot at the Capitol were rebuffed.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The former chief of U.S. Capitol Police says security officials at the House and Senate rebuffed his early requests to call in the National Guard ahead of a demonstration in support of President Trump that turned into a deadly attack on Congress.

Former chief Steven Sund -- who resigned his post last week after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called for him to step down -- made the assertions in an interview with The Washington Post published Sunday.

Sund contradicts claims made by officials after Wednesday's assault on Capitol Hill. Sund's superiors said previously that the National Guard and other additional security support could have been provided, but no one at the Capitol requested it.

Sund told the Post that House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving was concerned with the "optics" of declaring an emergency ahead of the protests and rejected a National Guard presence. He says Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger recommended that he informally request the Guard to be ready in case it was needed to maintain security.

Like Sund, Irving and Stenger have also since resigned their posts.

Sund says he requested assistance six times ahead of and during the attack on the Capitol. Each of those requests was denied or delayed, he says.

Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser also wanted a light police presence at the Capitol. She reportedly wanted to avoid a similar scenario as last summer, when federal forces responded to demonstrators opposed to police abuses who assembled near the White House.

During Wednesday's violence, Bowser requested, and received, a limited force of 340 from the D.C. National Guard. Those troops were unarmed and their job was to help with traffic flow — not law enforcement, which was meant to be handled by D.C. police.

When the mob reached the Capitol complex at about 12:40 p.m. ET on Wednesday, it took about 15 minutes for the west side perimeter of the building to be breached, he says. The Capitol Police contingent, which numbered around 1,400 that day, was quickly overrun by the estimated 8,000 rioters.

"If we would have had the National Guard we could have held them at bay longer, until more officers from our partner agencies could arrive," he says.

Sund says during a conference call with several law enforcement officials at about 2:26 p.m., he asked the Pentagon to provide backup.

Senior Army official Lt. Gen. Walter E. Piatt, director of the Army Staff, said on the call he couldn't recommend that Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy authorize deployment, Sund and others on the call told the Post. Piatt reportedly said, "I don't like the visual of the National Guard standing a police line with the Capitol in the background," the Post reported.

It would be more than three hours before any National Guard troops arrived, well after the damage at the Capitol had been done.

In the interview, Sund also issued a warning to federal officials, saying "if they don't get their act together with physical security, it's going to happen again."


DMV reports over 3,600 new COVID-19 cases this weekend

Maryland, Virginia and the District saw an increase of over 3,600 new coronavirus cases this weekend, bringing the region’s total to over 35,000 confirmed cases.

Maryland reported the biggest increase in new cases this weekend with 1,965 and also reported 104 new deaths. The state now totals 18,581 cases and 827 deaths, with a population of 6 million.

Virginia saw an increase of 1,376 new cases of the coronavirus and reported 29 new deaths, bringing the commonwealth’s totals to 12,970 cases and 448 deaths from a population of about 8.5 million.

The District confirmed 313 new cases and 25 deaths over the weekend. The city now tallies 3,841 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 178 deaths out of a population of about 700,000.

Maryland reported 1,177 people have been released from isolation, while the District reported 657 total recoveries. Virginia does not release this information.

Especially as the jurisdictions ramp up their testing efforts, the rate of positive tests will be a metric health departments use to measure the spread of the virus.

In the District, 18% of those tested on Saturday and 22% of those tested on Friday came back positive.

And in Maryland, 10% of those tested on Saturday and 26% of those tested on Friday came back positive.

Virginia does not share daily numbers of those tested overall, 17% of all of the coronavirus tests done in the state yielded positive results.


What lessons have been learned? What has to change? The Democrat and Chronicle posed questions to local leaders a year after the death of George Floyd.


Tony's Thoughts

The Broader Bolder Approach to Education (BBA) is a national campaign that acknowledges the impact of social and economic disadvantage on schools and students and proposes evidence-based policies to improve schools and remedy conditions that limit many children’s readiness to learn. As provided on the BBA website:

“The Economic Policy Institute convened the original BBA signatories and Task Force and continues to provide in-kind technical and logistical assistance. It is funded in part by the Nellie Mae Education Foundation, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, and Atlantic Philanthropies. ”

BBA recently issued a major report claiming that many of the accomplishments in school reform in three major cities (New York, Chicago, and Washington, D.C.) have been exaggerated. Specifically the Executive Summary of the report summarizes its findings as follows:

“Federal policies such as Race to the Top and No Child Left Behind, bolstered by organized advocacy efforts, is making a popular set of market-oriented education “reforms” look more like the new status quo than real reform.

Reformers assert that test-based teacher evaluation, increased school “choice” through expanded access to charter schools, and the closure of “failing” and under-enrolled schools will boost falling student achievement and narrow longstanding race- and income-based achievement gaps.

This report examines these assertions by assessing the impacts of these reforms in three large urban school districts: Washington, D.C., New York City, and Chicago. These districts were studied because all enjoy the benefit of mayoral control, produce reliable district-level test score data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), and were led by vocal reformers who implemented versions of this agenda.

The reforms deliver few benefits and in some cases harm the students they purport to help, while drawing attention and resources away from policies with real promise to address poverty-related barriers to school success:

.Test scores increased less, and achievement gaps grew more, in “reform” cities than in other urban districts.

.Reported successes for targeted students evaporated upon closer examination.

.Test-based accountability prompted churn that thinned the ranks of experienced teachers, but not necessarily bad teachers.

.School closures did not send students to better schools or save school districts money.

.Charter schools further disrupted the districts while providing mixed benefits, particularly for the highest-needs students.

. Emphasis on the widely touted market-oriented reforms drew attention and resources from initiatives with greater promise.

.The reforms missed a critical factor driving achievement gaps: the influence of poverty on academic performance. Real, sustained change requires strategies that are more realistic, patient, and multipronged.”

This report was written by Elaine Weiss and Don Long. Dr. Weiss is the national coordinator of the Broader, Bolder Approach to Education. She has a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a Ph.D. in public policy from The Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration at The George Washington University.

Don Long has been a consultant for BBA since November 2011. Mr. Long was director of the State Collaborative on Assessment and Student Standards (SCASS) and program manager at Pearson Educational Measurement in Austin, Texas. Long has a Master of Public Affairs degree from the LBJ School of Public Policy at the University of Texas, Austin.

This report provides important commentary on school reform and is a “must-read” for anyone interested in urban education.


Popular in Slate

Now, the hotel can count on neither tributes from governments and industry nor the protection of a self-interested landlord, while Trump has $170 million in loans on the property due by 2024. He personally guaranteed them and refinancing doesn’t seem like an option. His longtime lender, Deutsche Bank, is among those businesses trying to dump Trump, having finally decided he’s bad for business. Trump’s options include selling assets to pay off the loan or finding another company willing to lend a serial defaulter $170 million, give or take, to support an ostensibly money-losing business.

And yet: Trump’s D.C. hotel is still poised to reap the benefits of some partisans who don’t know—or refuse to acknowledge—that the Trumpworld celebrities have petered out, the Champagne sabers are sheathed, and the party is winding down.

Like on March 4, the original inauguration date for U.S. presidents. Many followers of the QAnon hoax believe Trump will regain the presidency that day and finally vanquish the Deep State. The cheapest rooms at the Trump Hotel D.C. that night start at more than $1,300.


Central Business District Washington, D.C.

Like the rest of the United States, the District of Columbia has seen severe impacts on the hospitality, convention, and visitor sectors from the COVID-19 pandemic, evidenced in the deep declines in visitation, hotel occupancy, jobs, and tax revenues. Retail and entertainment businesses, including small businesses, have suffered devastating losses. Many private businesses and organizations are experiencing a preference for remote working during the pandemic. The combination of the pandemic, the loss of jobs, and the precipitous drop in economic activity have revealed and amplified existing underlying community stresses and racial inequities.

As everywhere, communities of color have shouldered a disproportionately heavy burden from these public health, economic, and environmental challenges as well as long-embedded discrimination and systemic biases. These communities remind us daily of longstanding discrimination and lack of access to the education, health care, jobs, homes, and opportunities that build assets and wealth. The following section identifies the key actions the panel recommends to catalyze recovery and generate a more diverse and resilient Downtown D.C. economy.

Nonetheless, downtown Washington, D.C., remains an extraordinary asset as an economic, cultural, and intellectual center of global significance. It hosts one of the world&rsquos greatest collections of cultural institutions, top academic institutions and research centers, formal and informal parks, open spaces, and an expansive network of walkable streets and city blocks as laid out in 1791 by Pierre L&rsquoEnfant. It has also become a prime location for residential and mixed-use development.

Among the challenges and opportunities, the CBD faces as it works to recover from these multiple crises is the need to promote both its singular economic position, based on visitation, convening, and workplaces and small businesses, as well as the cultural and community assets that offer a more inclusive and distinctly Washington experience.

The immediate need is to advance the recovery of the business, tourist, and neighborhood activity as soon as possible while changing the role of the CBD over the longer term. This strategic thinking must address the disproportionate impact on communities of color and the need for new commitments to job creation and investments that advance essential goals of equity and social justice and aspire to create a broader and transformational downtown D.C. The outcome can be a more diverse downtown economy, one that is more adaptable and resilient and has a greater capacity to &ldquobounce forward&rdquo from the impacts of the pandemic, the distressed economy, and the challenges of social injustice.

Report Summary: Like the rest of the United States, the District of Columbia has seen severe impacts on the hospitality, convention, and visitor sectors from the COVID-19 pandemic, evidenced in the deep declines in visitation, hotel occupancy, jobs, and tax revenues. Retail and entertainment businesses, including small businesses, have suffered devastating losses. Many private businesses and organizations are experiencing a preference for remote working during the pandemic. The combination of the pandemic, the loss of jobs, and the precipitous drop in economic activity have revealed and amplified existing underlying community stresses and racial inequities.

As everywhere, communities of color have shouldered a disproportionately heavy burden from these public health, economic, and environmental challenges as well as long-embedded discrimination and systemic biases. These communities remind us daily of longstanding discrimination and lack of access to the education, health care, jobs, homes, and opportunities that build assets and wealth. The following section identifies the key actions the panel recommends to catalyze recovery and generate a more diverse and resilient Downtown D.C. economy.

Nonetheless, downtown Washington, D.C., remains an extraordinary asset as an economic, cultural, and intellectual center of global significance. It hosts one of the world&rsquos greatest collections of cultural institutions, top academic institutions and research centers, formal and informal parks, open spaces, and an expansive network of walkable streets and city blocks as laid out in 1791 by Pierre L&rsquoEnfant. It has also become a prime location for residential and mixed-use development.

Among the challenges and opportunities, the CBD faces as it works to recover from these multiple crises is the need to promote both its singular economic position, based on visitation, convening, and workplaces and small businesses, as well as the cultural and community assets that offer a more inclusive and distinctly Washington experience.


In Washington, D.C., a Weekend of Growing and Evolving Protests

By Saturday morning, the White House had been surrounded by approximately 1.7 miles of an eight-foot-tall, chain-link fence that had not been there a week earlier. As more than one person walking by it this weekend remarked, Donald Trump had finally gotten his wall, though this one was meant to keep Americans who were protesting racism and police violence out of Lafayette Park, a public space where people have long assembled to say their piece. By Sunday evening of a warm June weekend, during which thousands of people had marched, rallied, and sometimes danced in the streets, the fence had become something else again. Protesters had covered it with mostly homemade messages, including a sign that read “8:46,” the length of time that the Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin kept his knee on George Floyd’s neck a poster that read “Killed for Sleeping While Black,” next to a photograph of Breonna Taylor, the twenty-six-year-old E.M.T. shot in her bed by Louisville, Kentucky, police officers, in March a Martin Luther King, Jr., quote: “Out of a Mountain of Despair, a Stone of Hope” a poster reminding people of Lafayette Square’s connection to the slave trade a white T-shirt with the words “My Body Is Not a Target” written on it in marker a large “Ban Stop and Frisk” spelled out in multicolored ribbons tied to the mesh. The fence still stood, but it had morphed into a protest-art installation.

In a way, the evolution of the fence was an apt metaphor for the rapidly unfolding protests themselves. The weekend before, there had been some looting in D.C., as elsewhere, and a lot of worry about it. Buildings on Sixteenth Street, near the White House, had plywood covering sheet-glass windows—though several, such as the headquarters of the Motion Picture Association and of the Laborers’ International Union of North America, also displayed Black Lives Matter placards. The Monday before, law enforcement had used chemical agents, low-flying helicopters, and mounted police to clear the area of demonstrators so that the President could walk to St. John’s Church for that infamous photo op with the Bible.

This weekend, the protests in the capital, which comprised thousands of people, were calm. There were few official speakers, and not much sense of leadership, but activists with megaphones reminded people to be peaceful, and they were. Families with little kids were out in force among crowds that were notably racially mixed. I asked Rashawn Ray, a sociology professor at the University of Maryland, College Park, who studies social movements, about the diversity of the demonstrators, and he told me that he considers this to be “one of those rare moments in American history, a moment of white awakening” to the reality of black lives. He compared the reaction to the video of George Floyd’s death to the shift in consciousness galvanized by photographs of Emmett Till’s open casket, or footage of sheriffs fire-hosing civil-rights protesters in the nineteen-sixties, “when what was happening was captured on film, and could no longer be justified.” On Saturday, on the street that the mayor of Washington, D.C., Muriel Bowser, had renamed Black Lives Matter Plaza (street signs had been put up, and giant yellow painted letters spelled out the words on the street), d.j.s played Kendrick Lamar and Marvin Gaye remixes. All weekend, around the city, theatres and music venues opened their lobbies so that protesters could use the bathroom or take a rest. Volunteers lined march routes handing out snacks and water. Nearly everyone wore masks.

The message had cohered quite a bit during the week, too. A lot of the signs and chants centered on an idea new to a lot of Americans—reallocating funding from police departments to social programs, under the shorthand “Defund the Police.” On Sunday, on “Meet the Press,” Alicia Garza, one of the founders of Black Lives Matter Global Network, explained the slogan this way: “When we talk about defunding the police, what we’re saying is, invest in the resources that our communities need. So much of policing right now is generated and directed towards quality-of-life issues. What we do need is increased funding for housing, we need increased funding for education, we need increased funding for the quality of life of communities who are over-policed and over-surveilled.”

Given the root-and-branch approach of that message, and given that we’re still in the midst of a pandemic, the size of the crowds and their geographic spread—there have been Black Lives Matter demonstrations in small towns across the country—has been striking. In an online piece for the Washington Post, three researchers who study protest movements, Lara Putnam, Erica Chenoweth, and Jeremy Pressman, wrote that, according to their preliminary data, “far more places have held protests already than held Women’s Marches in January 2017.” As they also note, that “march occurred in 650 locations” and, until now, had more “participants than any other single-day demonstration in U.S. history.”

When I spoke with Putnam, who is a history professor at the University of Pittsburgh, she said that the mobilization of the marches had been unusual, too. In the small towns, it has “very consistently been high-school students and recent high-school grads, often among the few people of color in their community, stepping forward alongside white allies to organize.” Everywhere, the marchers skewed young (that’s partly because the Covid pandemic has kept older people home) and “a lot of the organizing is happening on TikTok and Instagram.” Many of the people who’d been activated are “completely disconnected to the networks of post-2016 grassroots, suburban, college-educated ‘resistance’ that have until now been the biggest sites of new civic engagement since Trump.”

On Sunday afternoon, at Dupont Circle, a young crowd had gathered for a Black Lives Matter march—one of about nine events that you could choose from that day in D.C., including a “NextSteps” rally at the African American Civil War Memorial, to discuss what kind of organizing should come out of the protests. Jonny Teklit, who is black, was in Dupont Circle with two white friends all three had just graduated from Franklin & Marshall College, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and had been staying close to home because of Covid-19. Teklit told me that it was the first march he’d come out to this week. “I’ve been doing the twenty-year-old thing of ‘Here’s where you should donate and here’s information.’ I’ve been doing that in my room. Like a little coördinator.” His friend Margot Rathke jumped in: “He’s been going on Instagram Live.” Teklit said, “There are jokes going around that Gen Z or teen-agers now get stressed about answering the phone or, like, asking for extra ketchup at the restaurant, but they will always in a heartbeat go out on the streets and defend human rights.”

When I Googled Teklit’s name later, I discovered that, in 2019, he’d been named the most promising young poet by the Academy of American Poets, for a beautiful sonnet he wrote that reimagined Icarus as a slave trying to escape. The last lines of the poem are:

Icarus plummets into the river and drowns.
The river carries him and spits him out
someplace colder, some unfamiliar South,
where he’ll tread forever in an ocean
always bloated blue with bodies of kin.

In Dupont Circle, as the crowd chanted, “No justice, no peace,” I asked him what he thought this activism could mean. “In the past few weeks, everyone has been talking about how it would be not really feasible to imagine the world going back to a pre-coronavirus time, how our lives are going to change, and we’re all going to adjust accordingly,” Teklit said. “I would imagine it would be the same for these types of protests. The ideal situation would be that people can’t really go back to the way things were before.”


A REPORTER IN WASHINGTON, D.C. I-SPRING NOTES

In diary form, writer goes over events in Wash. bet. Mar. 1 and Apr. 2, 1974. There is little to guide those who must design and direct the impeachment process. They virtually have to invent it. England, from which the framers of the Constitution borrowed the idea, hasn't used the impeachment procedure since the case of Warren Hastings in 1805. Here there have been only a few impeachments of judges. The impeachment of Andrew Johnson. was surrounded by post-Civil War bitterness & partisanship. It is not the sort of precedent that contemporary legislators wish to rely on The current impeachment proceeding may be setting precedents for future generations. This week (the beginning of Mar.) the White House issued a paper setting forth what it views as constituting an impeachable offense. The staff of the House Judiciary Committee's impeachment inquiry in a report issued in late Feb., rejects the argument that an impeachable offense must be a crime. Writer discussed impeachment with a number of Republican House members William Cohen of Maine & Tom Railsb ck both of House Judiciary Comm. John Anderson from Illinois Rep. John Rhodes. Also with Sen. Rob't Dole. All of them felt that impeachment was coming. A final interview with Ken Clawson, White House director of communications thought Nixon would not be impeached.


Violence erupts in Washington D.C. after Trump supporters rally

Several people were injured in a night of violence in Washington D.C., including eight police officers who were injured and four people were stabbed near Black Lives Matter Plaza. D.C. Metropolitan Police said Sunday that there were 33 unrelated arrests.

The violence followed pro-Trump rallies held on Saturday to dispute the election results .

The stabbings occurred in Northwest Washington D.C., about four blocks from the White House and near Black Lives Matter Plaza, around 9 p.m.. All victims were hospitalized for non-life threatening injuries, police said.

According to Metropolitan Police, the stabbings erupted after an argument.

Phillip Johnson, 29, was arrested for assault with a deadly weapon.

At least nine people were transported to area hospitals, including two officers, according to Washington D.C. EMS.

A Trump supporter waves a flag as the Proud Boys take over a major intersection near Hotel Harrington and Harry's Bar in Washington D.C., on December 12, 2020. John Lamparski/Sipa via AP Images

According to CBS Washington D.C. affiliate WUSA-TV, both Trump supporters and counter-protesters were in the area of Freedom Plaza and Black Lives Matter Plaza. It's unclear which groups were clashing.

Trending News

Nearby, the Asbury United Methodist Church said its Black Lives Matter sign was burned in the street. The church, which is on the District of Columbia Register of Historic Places and is the oldest Black church to remain on its original site, has been closed for in-person worship due to the COVID-19 pandemic .

Black Lives Matter said Sunday that a sign was also torn down from the Metropolitan AME Church, another historically African American church, WUSA-TV noted.

Metropolitan Police said Sunday that it was investigating the incidents that had been captured on video and posted online.

Several thousand people gathered in Washington D.C. earlier Saturday for a "Million MAGA March" in support of President Trump. Mr. Trump on Saturday tweeted his apparent surprise at the protest: "Wow! Thousands of people forming in Washington (D.C.) for Stop the Steal. Didn't know about this, but I'll be seeing them! #MAGA"

Mr. Trump has not yet conceded the 2020 election, despite all 50 states having certified their results, and after his last-ditch legal attempts were quashed in the courts. Electors will meet Monday to formally cast their votes for president and vice president, and those results will be counted by Congress on January 6. President-elect Joe Biden will be inaugurated on January 20.

A CBS News poll released on Sunday found that 82% of Mr. Trump's backers do not believe Mr. Biden is the "legitimate winner."


Watch the video: USA TOUR. WASHINGTON DC 72017 #BUHAY OFW (July 2022).


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